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Evidence for Increased 5α-Reductase Activity During Early Childhood in Daughters of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, May 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for Increased 5α-Reductase Activity During Early Childhood in Daughters of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Published in
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, May 2016
DOI 10.1210/jc.2015-3926
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura C. Torchen, Jan Idkowiak, Naomi R. Fogel, Donna M. O'Neil, Cedric H. L. Shackleton, Wiebke Arlt, Andrea Dunaif

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heritable, complex genetic disease. Animal models suggest that androgen exposure at critical developmental stages contributes to disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation resulting in increased androgen production produces the phenotypic features of PCOS by programming during critical developmental periods. Although we have not found evidence for increased in utero androgen levels in cord blood in the daughters of women with PCOS (PCOS-d), target tissue androgen production may be amplified by increased 5α-reductase activity analogous to findings in adult affected women. It is possible to noninvasively test this hypothesis by examining urinary steroid metabolites. We performed this study to investigate whether PCOS-d have altered androgen metabolism during early childhood. Twenty-one PCOS-d, 1-3 years old, and 36 control girls of comparable age were studied at an academic medical center. Urinary steroid metabolites were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 24-h steroid excretion rates and precursor to product ratios suggestive of 5α-reductase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were calculated. Age did not differ but weight for length z-scores were higher in PCOS-d compared to control girls (p=0.02). PCOS-d had increased 5α-tetrahydrocortisol:tetrahydrocortisol ratios (p=0.04) suggesting increased global 5α-reductase activity. There was no evidence for differences in 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. Steroid metabolite excretion was not correlated with weight. Our findings suggest that differences in androgen metabolism are present in early childhood in PCOS-d. Increased 5α-reductase activity could contribute to the development of PCOS by amplifying target tissue androgen action.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
Unknown 28 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 8 28%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2016.
All research outputs
#300,645
of 12,427,106 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
#310
of 10,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,837
of 273,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
#9
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,427,106 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,661 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.