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Dietary fat intakes in Irish adults in 2011: how much has changed in 10 years?

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Nutrition, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Dietary fat intakes in Irish adults in 2011: how much has changed in 10 years?
Published in
British Journal of Nutrition, March 2016
DOI 10.1017/s0007114516000787
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaifeng Li, Breige A. McNulty, Ann M. Tiernery, Niamh F. C. Devlin, Triona Joyce, Joao C. Leite, Albert Flynn, Janette Walton, Lorraine Brennan, Michael J. Gibney, Anne P. Nugent

Abstract

Imbalances in dietary fat intakes are linked to several chronic diseases. This study describes dietary intakes and food sources of fat and fatty acids in 1051 Irish adults (aged 18-90 years), using data from the 2011 national food consumption survey, the National Adult Nutrition Survey. It also compares current intakes for 18-64-year-olds with those reported in the last such survey in 2001, the North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey. Dietary fat intakes were estimated using data from 4-d semi-weighed (2011) and 7-d estimated (2001) food diaries. In 2011, intakes for 18-64-year-olds were as follows: total fat, 34·1 (sd 6·1) % total energy (%TE); SFA, 13·3 (sd 3·3) %TE; MUFA, 12·5 (sd 2·6) %TE; PUFA, 6·1 (sd 2·2) %TE; and trans-fat, 0·511 (sd 0·282) %TE. Apart from MUFA, intakes decreased (P65 years had the highest intakes of SFA; however, intakes were typically higher than UK-recommended values for all groups. In contrast, intakes of long-chain n-3 fatty acids were lowest in younger age groups. Intakes of trans-fat were well within UK-recommended levels. Although there have been some improvements in the profile of intakes since 2001, imbalances persist in the quantity and quality of dietary fat consumed by Irish adults, most notably for total and SFA and for younger age groups for long-chain n-3 fatty acids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 24%
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Computer Science 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2016.
All research outputs
#864,875
of 12,412,180 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Nutrition
#662
of 4,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,636
of 273,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Nutrition
#37
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,412,180 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,488 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,278 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.