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Coral-Associated Bacterial Diversity Is Conserved across Two Deep-Sea Anthothela Species

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

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79 Mendeley
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Title
Coral-Associated Bacterial Diversity Is Conserved across Two Deep-Sea Anthothela Species
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, April 2016
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2016.00458
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie N. Lawler, Christina A. Kellogg, Scott C. France, Rachel W. Clostio, Sandra D. Brooke, Steve W. Ross

Abstract

Cold-water corals, similar to tropical corals, contain diverse and complex microbial assemblages. These bacteria provide essential biological functions within coral holobionts, facilitating increased nutrient utilization and production of antimicrobial compounds. To date, few cold-water octocoral species have been analyzed to explore the diversity and abundance of their microbial associates. For this study, 23 samples of the family Anthothelidae were collected from Norfolk (n = 12) and Baltimore Canyons (n = 11) from the western Atlantic in August 2012 and May 2013. Genetic testing found that these samples comprised two Anthothela species (Anthothela grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) and Alcyonium grandiflorum. DNA was extracted and sequenced with primers targeting the V4-V5 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene using 454 pyrosequencing with GS FLX Titanium chemistry. Results demonstrated that the coral host was the primary driver of bacterial community composition. Al. grandiflorum, dominated by Alteromonadales and Pirellulales had much higher species richness, and a distinct bacterial community compared to Anthothela samples. Anthothela species (A. grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) had very similar bacterial communities, dominated by Oceanospirillales and Spirochaetes. Additional analysis of core-conserved bacteria at 90% sample coverage revealed genus level conservation across Anthothela samples. This core included unclassified Oceanospirillales, Kiloniellales, Campylobacterales, and genus Spirochaeta. Members of this core were previously recognized for their functional capabilities in nitrogen cycling and suggest the possibility of a nearly complete nitrogen cycle within Anthothela species. Overall, many of the bacterial associates identified in this study have the potential to contribute to the acquisition and cycling of nutrients within the coral holobiont.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 77 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 27%
Researcher 17 22%
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 33%
Environmental Science 19 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 18%
Unspecified 8 10%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2016.
All research outputs
#858,937
of 10,698,678 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#627
of 7,762 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,892
of 286,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#58
of 541 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,698,678 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,762 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,395 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 541 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.