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Fish oil supplementation suppresses resistance exercise and feeding-induced increases in anabolic signaling without affecting myofibrillar protein synthesis in young men

Overview of attention for article published in Physiological Reports, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 1,876)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
twitter
219 tweeters
facebook
14 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
169 Mendeley
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Title
Fish oil supplementation suppresses resistance exercise and feeding-induced increases in anabolic signaling without affecting myofibrillar protein synthesis in young men
Published in
Physiological Reports, March 2016
DOI 10.14814/phy2.12715
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris McGlory, Sophie L. Wardle, Lindsay S. Macnaughton, Oliver C. Witard, Fraser Scott, James Dick, J. Gordon Bell, Stuart M. Phillips, Stuart D. R. Galloway, D. Lee Hamilton, Kevin D. Tipton

Abstract

Fish oil (FO) supplementation potentiates muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in response to a hyperaminoacidemic-hyperinsulinemic infusion. WhetherFOsupplementation potentiatesMPSin response to protein ingestion or when protein ingestion is combined with resistance exercise (RE) remains unknown. In a randomized, parallel group design, 20 healthy males were randomized to receive 5 g/day of eitherFOor coconut oil control (CO) for 8 weeks. After supplementation, participants performed a bout of unilateralREfollowed by ingestion of 30 g of whey protein. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained before and after supplementation for assessment of muscle lipid composition and relevant protein kinase activities. Infusion ofl-[ring-(13)C6] phenylalanine was used to measure basal myofibrillarMPSat rest (REST), in a nonexercised leg following protein ingestion (FED) and followingREand protein ingestion (FEDEX).MPSwas significantly elevated aboveRESTduringFEDEXin both theFOandCOgroups, but there was no effect of supplementation. There was a significant increase inMPSin both groups aboveRESTduringFEDbut no effect of supplementation. Supplementation significantly decreased panPKBactivity atRESTin theFOgroup but not theCOgroup. There was a significant increase fromRESTat post-REforPKBandAMPKα2 activity in theCOgroup but not in theFOgroup. InFEDEX, there was a significant increase in p70S6K1 activity fromRESTat 3 h in theCOgroup only. These data highlight that 8 weeks ofFOsupplementation alters kinase signaling activity in response toREplus protein ingestion without influencingMPS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 219 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 169 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Unknown 165 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 19%
Student > Master 31 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 15%
Other 20 12%
Researcher 15 9%
Other 31 18%
Unknown 14 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 46 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 7%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 23 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 265. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2020.
All research outputs
#62,619
of 15,793,291 outputs
Outputs from Physiological Reports
#6
of 1,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,935
of 267,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physiological Reports
#1
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,793,291 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,876 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,568 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.