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Deciphering the transcriptional regulation and spatiotemporal distribution of immunity response in barley to Pyrenophora graminea fungal invasion

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, March 2016
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Title
Deciphering the transcriptional regulation and spatiotemporal distribution of immunity response in barley to Pyrenophora graminea fungal invasion
Published in
BMC Genomics, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2573-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ahmed Ghannam, Houda Alek, Sanaa Doumani, Doureid Mansour, Mohamad I. E. Arabi

Abstract

Barley leaf stripe disease, caused by the fungus Pyrenophora graminea (Pg), is a worldwide crop disease that results in significant loss of barley yield. The purpose of the present work was to use transcriptomic profiling to highlight barley genes and metabolic pathways affected or altered in response to Pg infection and consequently elucidate their involvement and contribution in resistance to leaf stripe. Our study examined and compared the transcriptomes of two barley genotypes using an established differential display reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) strategy at 14 and 20 days post-inoculation (dpi). A total of 54 significantly modulated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified. The analysis of gene expression changes during the course of infection with Pg suggested the involvement of 15 upregulated genes during the immunity response. By using network-based analyses, we could establish a significant correlation between genes expressed in response to Pg invasion. Microscopic analysis and quantitative PCR (qPCR) profiling of callose synthase and cellulose synthases revealed a direct involvement of cell wall reinforcement and callose deposition in the Pg-resistant phenotype. We have identified a number of candidate genes possibly involved in the host-pathogen interactions between barley and Pg fungus, 15 of which are specifically expressed in Pg-resistant plants. Collectively, our results suggest that the resistance to leaf stripe in barley proceeds through callose deposition and different oxidation processes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 25%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Professor 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 25%
Unspecified 1 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,440,145
of 7,435,912 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,841
of 5,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,028
of 275,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#208
of 229 outputs
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