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Off-treatment durability of antiviral response to nucleoside analogues in patients with chronic hepatitis B

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, March 2016
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Title
Off-treatment durability of antiviral response to nucleoside analogues in patients with chronic hepatitis B
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12876-016-0454-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naruhiko Nagata, Tatehiro Kagawa, Shunji Hirose, Yoshitaka Arase, Kota Tsuruya, Kazuya Anzai, Koichi Shiraishi, Tetsuya Mine

Abstract

Off-treatment durability of nucleoside analogue (NA) therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B has not been well investigated. In this study we monitored antiviral effect of NA therapy and evaluated off-treatment durability after NA cessation in patients with chronic hepatitis B. A total of 94 consecutive patients (39 HBeAg-negative and 55 HBeAg-positive patients) who received NA therapy were followed up for approximately 9 years. We discontinued NA according to the following criteria; undetectable serum HBV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on three separate occasions at least 6 months apart in HBeAg-negative patients (APASL stopping recommendation), and seroconversion from HBeAg-positive to HBeAb-positive and undetectable serum HBV-DNA by PCR for at least 12 months in HBeAg-positive patients. The cumulative rate of relapse after NA cessation was 48 % and 40 % in HBeAg-negative and -positive patients, respectively. Higher baseline serum alanine aminotransferase level was the only significant predictor for maintaining remission. No patients experienced decompensation after relapse. HBsAg loss occurred at an annual rate of 1.4 % and 0.4 % in HBeAg-negative and -positive patients, respectively. Hepatocellular carcinoma developed at an annual rate of 0.6 % in both HBeAg-negative and -positive patients. Almost half of the patients did not relapse after cessation of NA therapy in both HBeAg-negative and -positive patients. Therefore, NA therapy could be discontinued with close monitoring if the APASL stopping recommendation is satisfied even in HBeAg-negative patients.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 36%
Other 4 29%
Professor 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Decision Sciences 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,440,068
of 7,435,912 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#571
of 672 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,979
of 275,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#12
of 17 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.