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The Decline of Elective Colectomy Following Diverticulitis

Overview of attention for article published in Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
Title
The Decline of Elective Colectomy Following Diverticulitis
Published in
Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, April 2016
DOI 10.1097/dcr.0000000000000561
Pubmed ID
Authors

Debbie Li, Nancy N. Baxter, Robin S. McLeod, Rahim Moineddin, Avery B. Nathens

Abstract

The indications for interval elective colectomy following diverticulitis are unclear; evidence lends increasing support for nonoperative management. This study aims to evaluate the temporal trends in the use of elective colectomy following diverticulitis. This is a population-based retrospective cohort study using administrative discharge data. This study was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Patients who had had an episode of diverticulitis managed nonoperatively and were eligible for elective colectomy, from 2002 to 2012, were selected. Changes in the proportion of patients who undergo elective colectomy following an episode of diverticulitis treated nonoperatively were evaluated. Cochran-Armitage was used to test for trends; adjusted analysis was performed by using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. A total of 14,124 patients were admitted with an episode of diverticulitis and treated nonoperatively, making them eligible for interval elective colectomy. Median follow-up was 3.9 years (maximum, 10; interquartile range, 1.7-6.4). Overall, 1342 (9.5%) patients underwent elective colectomy; 33% of these colectomies were performed laparoscopically, and 7.5% patients received an ostomy. In-hospital mortality was 0.2%. The majority (76%) of elective operations were performed within 1 year of discharge (median, 160 days; interquartile range, 88-346). The proportion of patients undergoing elective colectomy within 1 year of discharge declined from 9.6% of patients in 2002 to 3.9% by 2011 (p < 0.001). The decline was most pronounced in patients <50 years of age (from 17% to 5%), and those with complicated disease (from 28% to 8%) (all p < 0.001). In multivariable regression, younger age, lower medical comorbidity, complicated disease, and early readmission were associated with elective colectomy. After adjusting for changes in patient characteristics, the odds of elective surgery decreased by 0.93 per annum (adjusted OR; 95% CI, 0.90-0.95). Administrative health databases contain limited clinical detail; the rationale for elective surgery was not available. Consistent with evolving practice guidelines, there has been a decrease in the use of elective colectomy following an episode of diverticulitis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 8%
Unknown 11 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 33%
Researcher 3 25%
Other 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 75%
Computer Science 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,317,358
of 12,549,065 outputs
Outputs from Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
#226
of 2,789 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,100
of 265,241 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
#2
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,549,065 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,789 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,241 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.