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Increased risk of rectal cancer after prostate radiation: A population-based study

Overview of attention for article published in Gastroenterology, April 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
155 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
Title
Increased risk of rectal cancer after prostate radiation: A population-based study
Published in
Gastroenterology, April 2005
DOI 10.1053/j.gastro.2004.12.038
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nancy N. Baxter, Joel E. Tepper, Sara B. Durham, David A. Rothenberger, Beth A. Virnig

Abstract

Radiation therapy for prostate cancer has been associated with an increased rate of pelvic malignancies, particularly bladder cancer. The association between radiation therapy and colorectal cancer has not been established. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry data from 1973 through 1994. We focused on men with prostate cancer, but with no previous history of colorectal cancer, treated with either surgery or radiation who survived at least 5 years. We evaluated the effect of radiation on development of cancer for 3 sites: definitely irradiated sites (rectum), potentially irradiated sites (rectosigmoid, sigmoid, and cecum), and nonirradiated sites (the rest of the colon). Using a proportional hazards model, we evaluated the effect of radiation on development of colorectal cancer over time. A total of 30,552 men received radiation, and 55,263 underwent surgery only. Colorectal cancers developed in 1437 patients: 267 in irradiated sites, 686 in potentially irradiated sites, and 484 in nonirradiated sites. Radiation was independently associated with development of cancer over time in irradiated sites but not in the remainder of the colon. The adjusted hazards ratio for development of rectal cancer was 1.7 for the radiation group, compared with the surgery-only group (95% CI: 1.4-2.2). We noted a significant increase in development of rectal cancer after radiation for prostate cancer. Radiation had no effect on development of cancer in the remainder of the colon, indicating that the effect is specific to directly irradiated tissue.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 15%
Student > Postgraduate 8 13%
Student > Master 6 10%
Other 18 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 69%
Unspecified 8 13%
Engineering 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2018.
All research outputs
#876,156
of 12,617,609 outputs
Outputs from Gastroenterology
#751
of 8,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,598
of 264,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gastroenterology
#33
of 177 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,617,609 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,142 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,853 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 177 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.