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Genomic signatures of population decline in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Genomic signatures of population decline in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1214-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samantha M. O’Loughlin, Stephen M. Magesa, Charles Mbogo, Franklin Mosha, Janet Midega, Austin Burt

Abstract

Population genomic features such as nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium are expected to be strongly shaped by changes in population size, and might therefore be useful for monitoring the success of a control campaign. In the Kilifi district of Kenya, there has been a marked decline in the abundance of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae subsequent to the rollout of insecticide-treated bed nets. To investigate whether this decline left a detectable population genomic signature, simulations were performed to compare the effect of population crashes on nucleotide diversity, Tajima's D, and linkage disequilibrium (as measured by the population recombination parameter ρ). Linkage disequilibrium and ρ were estimated for An. gambiae from Kilifi, and compared them to values for Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles merus at the same location, and for An. gambiae in a location 200 km from Kilifi. In the first simulations ρ changed more rapidly after a population crash than the other statistics, and therefore is a more sensitive indicator of recent population decline. In the empirical data, linkage disequilibrium extends 100-1000 times further, and ρ is 100-1000 times smaller, for the Kilifi population of An. gambiae than for any of the other populations. There were also significant runs of homozygosity in many of the individual An. gambiae mosquitoes from Kilifi. These results support the hypothesis that the recent decline in An. gambiae was driven by the rollout of bed nets. Measuring population genomic parameters in a small sample of individuals before, during and after vector or pest control may be a valuable method of tracking the effectiveness of interventions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 6%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 30 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2016.
All research outputs
#571,416
of 7,644,999 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#171
of 2,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,528
of 278,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#8
of 194 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,644,999 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,576 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 194 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.