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Dementia and Physical Activity (DAPA) - an exercise intervention to improve cognition in people with mild to moderate dementia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
197 Mendeley
Title
Dementia and Physical Activity (DAPA) - an exercise intervention to improve cognition in people with mild to moderate dementia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Trials, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1288-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicky Atherton, Chris Bridle, Deborah Brown, Helen Collins, Sukhdeep Dosanjh, Frances Griffiths, Susie Hennings, Kamran Khan, Ranjit Lall, Samantha Lyle, Rupert McShane, Dipesh Mistry, Vivien Nichols, Stavros Petrou, Bart Sheehan, Anne-Marie Slowther, Margaret Thorogood, Emma Withers, Peter Zeh, Sarah E. Lamb

Abstract

Dementia is more common in older than in younger people, and as a result of the ageing of the population in developed countries, it is becoming more prevalent. Drug treatments for dementia are limited, and the main support offered to people with dementia and their families is generally services to mitigate against loss of function. Physical exercise is a candidate non-pharmacological treatment for dementia. DAPA is a randomised controlled trial funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme to estimate the effect of a 4-month, moderate- to hard-intensity exercise training programme and subsequent advice to remain active, on cognition (primary outcome) at 12 months in people with mild to moderate dementia. Community-dwelling participants (with their carers where possible), who are able to walk 3 metres without human assistance, able to undertake an exercise programme and do not have any unstable or terminal illness are recruited. Participants are then randomised by an independent statistician using a computerised random number generator to usual care or exercise at a 2:1 ratio in favour of exercise. The exercise intervention comprises 29, 1-hour-long exercise classes, run twice weekly at suitable venues such as leisure centres, which include aerobic exercise (on static bikes) and resistance exercise (using weights). Goals for independent exercise are set while the classes are still running, and supported thereafter with phone calls. The primary outcome is measured using ADAS-cog. Secondary outcome measures include behavioural symptoms, functional ability, quality of life and carer burden. Primary and secondary outcomes will be measured at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after randomisation, by researchers masked to participant randomisation in the participants' own homes. An economic evaluation will be carried out in parallel to the RCT, as will a qualitative study capturing the experiences of participants, carers and staff delivering the intervention. The DAPA study will be the first large, randomised trial of the cognitive effects of exercise on people with dementia. The intervention is designed to be capable of being delivered within the constraints of NHS service provision, and the economic evaluation will allow assessment of its cost-effectiveness. DAPA was registered with the ISRCTN database on 29 July 2011, registration number ISRCTN32612072 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 197 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 195 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 16%
Researcher 31 16%
Student > Bachelor 26 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 9%
Other 39 20%
Unknown 30 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 38 19%
Psychology 27 14%
Sports and Recreations 17 9%
Social Sciences 12 6%
Other 19 10%
Unknown 42 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,466,192
of 13,288,667 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#609
of 3,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,999
of 266,123 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,288,667 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,335 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,123 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them