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Energetic costs of mange in wolves estimated from infrared thermography

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
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Title
Energetic costs of mange in wolves estimated from infrared thermography
Published in
Ecology, August 2016
DOI 10.1890/15-1346.1
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. C. Cross, E. S. Almberg, C. G. Haase, P. J. Hudson, S. K. Maloney, M. C. Metz, A. J. Munn, P. Nugent, O. Putzeys, D. R. Stahler, A. C. Stewart, D. W. Smith

Abstract

Parasites, by definition, extract energy from their hosts and thus affect trophic and food web dynamics even when the parasite may have limited effects on host population size. We studied the energetic costs of mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) in wolves (Canis lupus) using thermal cameras to estimate heat losses associated with compromised insulation during the winter. We combined the field data of known, naturally infected wolves with a data set on captive wolves with shaved patches of fur as a positive control to simulate mange-induced hair loss. We predict that during the winter in Montana, more severe mange infection increases heat loss by around 5.2-12 MJ per night (1,240-2,850 kcal, or a 65-78% increase) for small and large wolves, respectively, accounting for wind effects. To maintain body temperature would require a significant proportion of a healthy wolf's total daily energy demands (18-22 MJ/day). We also predict how these thermal costs may increase in colder climates by comparing our predictions in Bozeman, Montana to those from a place with lower ambient temperatures (Fairbanks, Alaska). Contrary to our expectations, the 14°C differential between these regions was not as important as the potential differences in wind speed. These large increases in energetic demands can be mitigated by either increasing consumption rates or decreasing other energy demands. Data from GPS-collared wolves indicated that healthy wolves move, on average, 17 km per day, which was reduced by 1.5, 1.8, and 6.5 km for light, medium, and severe hair loss. In addition, the wolf with the most hair loss was less active at night and more active during the day, which is the converse of the movement patterns of healthy wolves. At the individual level, mange infections create significant energy demands and altered behavioral patterns, this may have cascading effects on prey consumption rates, food web dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and scavenger communities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 85 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 24%
Student > Master 17 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 6 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 51%
Environmental Science 16 18%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 9%
Engineering 2 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2018.
All research outputs
#762,245
of 17,096,050 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#374
of 5,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,828
of 271,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#7
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,096,050 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,994 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,095 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.