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Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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869 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1419 Mendeley
citeulike
10 CiteULike
Title
Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise
Published in
Nature, March 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature17145
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert M. DeConto, David Pollard

Abstract

Polar temperatures over the last several million years have, at times, been slightly warmer than today, yet global mean sea level has been 6-9 metres higher as recently as the Last Interglacial (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) and possibly higher during the Pliocene epoch (about three million years ago). In both cases the Antarctic ice sheet has been implicated as the primary contributor, hinting at its future vulnerability. Here we use a model coupling ice sheet and climate dynamics-including previously underappreciated processes linking atmospheric warming with hydrofracturing of buttressing ice shelves and structural collapse of marine-terminating ice cliffs-that is calibrated against Pliocene and Last Interglacial sea-level estimates and applied to future greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Antarctica has the potential to contribute more than a metre of sea-level rise by 2100 and more than 15 metres by 2500, if emissions continue unabated. In this case atmospheric warming will soon become the dominant driver of ice loss, but prolonged ocean warming will delay its recovery for thousands of years.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 540 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,419 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 <1%
Australia 4 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Belgium 3 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Other 8 <1%
Unknown 1375 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 346 24%
Researcher 253 18%
Student > Master 232 16%
Student > Bachelor 143 10%
Professor 62 4%
Other 206 15%
Unknown 177 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 607 43%
Environmental Science 245 17%
Engineering 79 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 70 5%
Physics and Astronomy 37 3%
Other 153 11%
Unknown 228 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3696. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2021.
All research outputs
#644
of 17,154,907 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#83
of 79,171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8
of 269,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#3
of 996 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,154,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 88.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 996 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.