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Regulatory modules controlling early shade avoidance response in maize seedlings

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, March 2016
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Title
Regulatory modules controlling early shade avoidance response in maize seedlings
Published in
BMC Genomics, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2593-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hai Wang, Guangxia Wu, Binbin Zhao, Baobao Wang, Zhihong Lang, Chunyi Zhang, Haiyang Wang

Abstract

Optimization of shade avoidance response (SAR) is crucial for enhancing crop yield in high-density planting conditions in modern agriculture, but a comprehensive study of the regulatory network of SAR is still lacking in monocot crops. In this study, the genome-wide early responses in maize seedlings to the simulated shade (low red/far-red ratio) and also to far-red light treatment were transcriptionally profiled. The two processes were predominantly mediated by phytochrome B and phytochrome A, respectively. Clustering of differentially transcribed genes (DTGs) along with functional enrichment analysis identified important biological processes regulated in response to both treatments. Co-expression network analysis identified two transcription factor modules as potentially pivotal regulators of SAR and de-etiolation, respectively. A comprehensive cross-species comparison of orthologous DTG pairs between maize and Arabidopsis in SAR was also conducted, with emphasis on regulatory circuits controlling accelerated flowering and elongated growth, two physiological hallmarks of SAR. Moreover, it was found that the genome-wide distribution of DTGs in SAR and de-etiolation both biased toward the maize1 subgenome, and this was associated with differential retention of various cis-elements between the two subgenomes. The results provide the first transcriptional picture for the early dynamics of maize phytochrome signaling. Candidate genes with regulatory functions involved in maize shade avoidance response have been identified, offering a starting point for further functional genomics investigation of maize adaptation to heavily shaded field conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sri Lanka 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 20%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Unspecified 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,656,129
of 7,474,500 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,324
of 5,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,632
of 272,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#200
of 233 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,474,500 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,474 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 233 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.