↓ Skip to main content

Is there a biological difference between trauma-related depression and PTSD? DST says ‘NO’

Overview of attention for article published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, September 2012
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Is there a biological difference between trauma-related depression and PTSD? DST says ‘NO’
Published in
Psychoneuroendocrinology, September 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2012.02.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danka Savic, Goran Knezevic, Svetozar Damjanovic, Zeljko Spiric, Gordana Matic

Abstract

The use of the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (DST) as a potentially discriminative marker between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression is still under discussion. In order to compare the influence of these psychopathologies on the DST results, we examined suppression in war-traumatized subjects with one or both of these disorders, as well as in healthy controls. Based on our previous findings, we hypothesized that subjects with any disorder would exhibit higher dexamethasone suppression than healthy controls due to traumatic experiences. This study was a part of a broader project in which simultaneous psychological and biological investigations were carried out in hospital conditions on 399 male participants: 57 with PTSD, 28 with depression, 76 with PTSD+depression, and 238 healthy controls. Cortisol was measured in blood samples taken at 0900 h before and after administering 0.5mg of dexamethasone (at 2300 h). Group means ± standard deviation of cortisol suppression were: 79.4±18.5 in the PTSD group, 80.8±11.6 in the depression group, 77.5±24.6 in the group with PTSD+depression, and 66.8±34.6 in healthy controls. The first three groups suppressed significantly more than the fourth. When the number of traumas was introduced as a covariate, the differences disappeared. The hypothesis was confirmed: in respect to DST, the examined trauma-related psychopathologies showed the same pattern: hypersuppression, due to multiple traumatic experiences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Romania 1 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Serbia 1 2%
Unknown 37 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 8 19%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 17%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 11 26%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 14%
Neuroscience 4 10%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2012.
All research outputs
#3,083,771
of 4,506,977 outputs
Outputs from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#900
of 1,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,306
of 76,618 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#19
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,506,977 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,262 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 76,618 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.