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Blood-Pressure Lowering in Intermediate-Risk Persons without Cardiovascular Disease

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, April 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
105 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
440 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Blood-Pressure Lowering in Intermediate-Risk Persons without Cardiovascular Disease
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, April 2016
DOI 10.1056/nejmoa1600175
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eva M. Lonn, Jackie Bosch, Patricio López-Jaramillo, Jun Zhu, Lisheng Liu, Prem Pais, Rafael Diaz, Denis Xavier, Karen Sliwa, Antonio Dans, Alvaro Avezum, Leopoldo S. Piegas, Katalin Keltai, Matyas Keltai, Irina Chazova, Ron J.G. Peters, Claes Held, Khalid Yusoff, Basil S. Lewis, Petr Jansky, Alexander Parkhomenko, Kamlesh Khunti, William D. Toff, Christopher M. Reid, John Varigos, Lawrence A. Leiter, Dora I. Molina, Robert McKelvie, Janice Pogue, Joanne Wilkinson, Hyejung Jung, Gilles Dagenais, Salim Yusuf, Lonn, Eva M, Bosch, Jackie, López-Jaramillo, Patricio, Zhu, Jun, Liu, Lisheng, Pais, Prem, Diaz, Rafael, Xavier, Denis, Sliwa, Karen, Dans, Antonio, Avezum, Alvaro, Piegas, Leopoldo S, Keltai, Katalin, Keltai, Matyas, Chazova, Irina, Peters, Ron J G, Held, Claes, Yusoff, Khalid, Lewis, Basil S, Jansky, Petr, Parkhomenko, Alexander, Khunti, Kamlesh, Toff, William D, Reid, Christopher M, Varigos, John, Leiter, Lawrence A, Molina, Dora I, McKelvie, Robert, Pogue, Janice, Wilkinson, Joanne, Jung, Hyejung, Dagenais, Gilles, Yusuf, Salim, , , Lonn, Eva M., Lonn, E. M.

Abstract

Background Antihypertensive therapy reduces the risk of cardiovascular events among high-risk persons and among those with a systolic blood pressure of 160 mm Hg or higher, but its role in persons at intermediate risk and with lower blood pressure is unclear. Methods In one comparison from a 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned 12,705 participants at intermediate risk who did not have cardiovascular disease to receive either candesartan at a dose of 16 mg per day plus hydrochlorothiazide at a dose of 12.5 mg per day or placebo. The first coprimary outcome was the composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke; the second coprimary outcome additionally included resuscitated cardiac arrest, heart failure, and revascularization. The median follow-up was 5.6 years. Results The mean blood pressure of the participants at baseline was 138.1/81.9 mm Hg; the decrease in blood pressure was 6.0/3.0 mm Hg greater in the active-treatment group than in the placebo group. The first coprimary outcome occurred in 260 participants (4.1%) in the active-treatment group and in 279 (4.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.10; P=0.40); the second coprimary outcome occurred in 312 participants (4.9%) and 328 participants (5.2%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.11; P=0.51). In one of the three prespecified hypothesis-based subgroups, participants in the subgroup for the upper third of systolic blood pressure (>143.5 mm Hg) who were in the active-treatment group had significantly lower rates of the first and second coprimary outcomes than those in the placebo group; effects were neutral in the middle and lower thirds (P=0.02 and P=0.009, respectively, for trend in the two outcomes). Conclusions Therapy with candesartan at a dose of 16 mg per day plus hydrochlorothiazide at a dose of 12.5 mg per day was not associated with a lower rate of major cardiovascular events than placebo among persons at intermediate risk who did not have cardiovascular disease. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and AstraZeneca; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00468923 .).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 4 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 15%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 85%
Computer Science 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1160. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,090
of 7,733,665 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#66
of 19,208 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106
of 274,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#7
of 335 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,733,665 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 19,208 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,883 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 335 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.