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Workload, mental health and burnout indicators among female physicians

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
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Title
Workload, mental health and burnout indicators among female physicians
Published in
Human Resources for Health, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12960-016-0108-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zsuzsa Győrffy, Diana Dweik, Edmond Girasek

Abstract

Female doctors in Hungary have worse indicators of physical and mental health compared with other professional women. We aimed to cast light on possible indicators of mental health, workload, and burnout of female physicians. Two time-points (T) were compared, in 2003 (T1 n = 408) and 2013 (T2 n = 2414), based on two nationally representative surveys of female doctors, and comparison made with data from other professional control groups. Independent samples t test or chi-squared test was used both for the two time-point comparison and the comparison between the index and the control groups. The background factors of sleep disorders and burnout were assessed by binary logistic regression analysis. No significant differences in the rates of depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts and attempts were detected between the 2003 and 2013 cohorts, but the prevalence of sleep disorders increased. The workload increased, and there was less job satisfaction in 2013 than in 2003, coupled to more stressful or difficult work-related situations. The personal accomplishment component of burnout significantly decreased in line with the declining work-related satisfaction. Compared to the professional control groups, the prevalence of depressive symptoms, suicide attempts, and sleep disorders was higher among female physicians at both time-points. The number of workplaces, frequency of work-related stressful situations, and intensive role conflict was associated with sleep disorders and decreased personal accomplishment. In comparison with the other professional groups, female doctors had worse mental health indicators with regard to depression, suicidal ideas, and sleep disorders both in 2003 and 2013 while within professional strata the changes seemed to be less. Increasing workload had a clear impact on sleep disorders and the personal accomplishment dimension of burnout.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Uruguay 1 <1%
Bangladesh 1 <1%
Unknown 120 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 16%
Student > Master 19 16%
Researcher 14 11%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Other 30 25%
Unknown 9 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 17%
Psychology 16 13%
Social Sciences 10 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 5%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 12 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2019.
All research outputs
#1,782,995
of 14,218,657 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#242
of 774 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,128
of 263,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#2
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,218,657 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 774 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 8 of them.