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Short bowel syndrome (SBS)-associated alterations within the gut-liver axis evolve early and persist long-term in the piglet model of short bowel syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Short bowel syndrome (SBS)-associated alterations within the gut-liver axis evolve early and persist long-term in the piglet model of short bowel syndrome
Published in
Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, November 2016
DOI 10.1111/jgh.13383
Pubmed ID
Authors

Prue M Pereira-Fantini, Julie E Bines, Susan Lapthorne, Fiona Fouhy, Michelle Scurr, Paul D Cotter, Cormac GM Gahan, Susan A Joyce

Abstract

Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is primarily characterised by malabsorption and malnutrition resulting from loss of intestinal absorptive area following massive small bowel resection (SBR). Bile acids and the gut microbiota are functionally-linked within the gut-liver axis, however SBS-associated disturbances within the gut-liver axis remain largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the evolution of bile acid alterations within the gut-liver axis at both short- and long-term time points and to relate these changes to alterations in colonic bacterial composition. Four week-old piglets were assigned to 75% small bowel resection (SBR), sham operation or non-operation control (NOC) groups. High throughput sequencing was employed to determine bacterial abundance in colonic content and ultra-performance liquid chromatography used to determine the bile acid concentration of gall bladder, portal serum and faecal samples. Bile acid complexity and relative abundance are altered in the SBS piglet model at two weeks post-SBR, and these changes persisted at six weeks post-SBR. Our examination of the microbial profile revealed an early and persistent loss in bacteria belonging to the Clostridiales order. This study provides evidence of an early and persistent disturbance of the bile acid profile throughout the entero-hepatic circulation with an increase in the proportion of primary bile acids and a decrease in secondary bile acids following small bowel resection. These changes were associated with a loss of bacteria belonging to the Clostridiales order consistent with a disturbance in the bile-microbial axis following SBR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,285,562
of 14,354,109 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
#246
of 1,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,808
of 264,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
#11
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,354,109 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,885 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.