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Malignant hepatic epithelioid angiomyolipoma with recurrence in the lung 7 years after hepatectomy: a case report and literature review

Overview of attention for article published in Surgical Case Reports, April 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Title
Malignant hepatic epithelioid angiomyolipoma with recurrence in the lung 7 years after hepatectomy: a case report and literature review
Published in
Surgical Case Reports, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40792-016-0158-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yasunari Fukuda, Hideyasu Omiya, Koji Takami, Kiyoshi Mori, Yoshinori Kodama, Masayuki Mano, Yoriko Nomura, Jun Akiba, Hirohisa Yano, Osamu Nakashima, Mitsumasa Ogawara, Eiji Mita, Shoji Nakamori, Mitsugu Sekimoto

Abstract

Angiomyolipoma (AML) arising in the liver is rare and usually benign, but it occasionally has malignant potential. A 58-year-old man with a liver tumor identified by a previous doctor with features suggestive of hepatocellular carcinoma on computed tomography (CT) underwent anterior segmentectomy of the liver in 2006. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of exclusively epithelioid cells that were scatteredly positive for human melanoma black 45 on immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, primary hepatic epithelioid AML (eAML) was diagnosed. The patient was subsequently referred to our hospital for follow-up after hepatectomy. He had event-free survival for nearly 7 years. In 2013, two well-defined round nodules were detected in the right lung field by chest CT, and partial pneumonectomy was performed for diagnosis and treatment. Histological examination of the resected lung tissue showed that it was morphologically and immunohistochemically identical to his primary hepatic eAML, leading to the diagnosis of pulmonary metastasis. This paper demonstrates a rare case of malignant hepatic eAML with late recurrence in the lung after hepatectomy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 25%
Student > Master 2 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,663,215
of 7,483,631 outputs
Outputs from Surgical Case Reports
#18
of 70 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,699
of 272,789 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Surgical Case Reports
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,483,631 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,789 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.