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Cannabinoids Induce Cancer Cell Proliferation via Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Converting Enzyme (TACE/ADAM17)-Mediated Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, March 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 17,398)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
54 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
569 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
25 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
224 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
215 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Cannabinoids Induce Cancer Cell Proliferation via Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Converting Enzyme (TACE/ADAM17)-Mediated Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor
Published in
Cancer Research, March 2004
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-03-3720
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefan Hart, Oliver M. Fischer, Axel Ullrich

Abstract

Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their endogenous counterparts were reported as useful analgetic agents to accompany primary cancer treatment by preventing nausea, vomiting, and pain and by stimulating appetite. Moreover, they have been shown to inhibit cell growth and to induce apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate that anandamide, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), HU-210, and Win55,212-2 promote mitogenic kinase signaling in cancer cells. Treatment of the glioblastoma cell line U373-MG and the lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H292 with nanomolar concentrations of THC led to accelerated cell proliferation that was completely dependent on metalloprotease and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity. EGFR signal transactivation was identified as the mechanistic link between cannabinoid receptors and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 as well as prosurvival protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) signaling. Depending on the cellular context, signal cross-communication was mediated by shedding of proAmphiregulin (proAR) and/or proHeparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) by tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17). Taken together, our data show that concentrations of THC comparable with those detected in the serum of patients after THC administration accelerate proliferation of cancer cells instead of apoptosis and thereby contribute to cancer progression in patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 54 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 3%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Spain 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Other 4 2%
Unknown 194 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 43 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 17%
Student > Master 31 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 11%
Student > Postgraduate 14 7%
Other 41 19%
Unknown 26 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 48 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 13 6%
Neuroscience 11 5%
Other 28 13%
Unknown 35 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 292. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2022.
All research outputs
#86,433
of 21,429,365 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#44
of 17,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#306
of 140,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#2
of 282 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,429,365 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,398 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 140,479 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 282 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.