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Circadian clocks and the regulation of virulence in fungi: Getting up to speed

Overview of attention for article published in Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology, September 2016
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39 Mendeley
Title
Circadian clocks and the regulation of virulence in fungi: Getting up to speed
Published in
Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology, September 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.semcdb.2016.03.021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Montserrat A. Hevia, Paulo Canessa, Luis F. Larrondo

Abstract

You cannot escape time. Therefore, it seems wise to learn how to keep track of it and use it to your advantage. Circadian clocks are molecular circuits that allow organisms to temporally coordinate a plethora of processes, including gene expression, with a close to 24hours rhythm, optimizing cellular function in synchrony with daily environmental cycles. The molecular bases of these clocks have been extensively studied in the fungus Neurospora crassa, providing a detailed molecular description. Surprisingly, there is scarce molecular information of clocks in fungi other than Neurospora, despite the existence of rhythmic phenomena in many fungal species, including pathogenic ones. This review will comment on the overall importance of clocks, what is known in Neurospora and what has been described in other fungi including new insights on the evolution of fungal clock components. The molecular description of the circadian system of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea will be revisited, as well as time-of-the-day variation in host-pathogen interaction dynamics, utilizing an Arabidopsis-Botrytis system, including also what is known regarding circadian regulation of defense mechanisms in the Arabidopsis thaliana plant model. Finally, this review will mention how little is known about circadian regulation of human pathogenic fungi, commenting on potential future directions and the overall perspective of fungal circadian studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 3%
France 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 36 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 28%
Researcher 10 26%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 21%
Unspecified 2 5%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2016.
All research outputs
#9,756,668
of 12,206,093 outputs
Outputs from Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
#845
of 1,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,614
of 282,312 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
#31
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,206,093 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,146 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.