↓ Skip to main content

Playing the policy game: a review of the barriers to and enablers of nutrition policy change

Overview of attention for article published in Public Health Nutrition, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
33 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Playing the policy game: a review of the barriers to and enablers of nutrition policy change
Published in
Public Health Nutrition, April 2016
DOI 10.1017/s1368980016000677
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine Cullerton, Timothy Donnet, Amanda Lee, Danielle Gallegos

Abstract

To progress nutrition policy change and develop more effective advocates, it is useful to consider real-world factors and practical experiences of past advocacy efforts to determine the key barriers to and enablers of nutrition policy change. The present review aimed to identify and synthesize the enablers of and barriers to public policy change within the field of nutrition. Electronic databases were searched systematically for studies examining policy making in public health nutrition. An interpretive synthesis was undertaken. International, national, state and local government jurisdictions within high-income, democratic countries. Sixty-three studies were selected for inclusion. Numerous themes were identified explaining the barriers to and enablers of policy change, all of which fell under the overarching category of 'political will', underpinned by a second major category, 'public will'. Sub-themes, including pressure from industry, neoliberal ideology, use of emotions and values, and being visible, were prevalent in describing links between public will, political will and policy change. The frustration around lack of public policy change in nutrition frequently stems from a belief that policy making is a rational process in which evidence is used to assess the relative costs and benefits of options. The findings from the present review confirm that evidence is only one component of influencing policy change. For policy change to occur there needs to be the political will, and often the public will, for the proposed policy problem and solution. The review presents a suite of enablers which can assist health professionals to influence political and public will in future advocacy efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 22%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Researcher 5 12%
Other 4 10%
Other 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 15 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 27%
Unspecified 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2017.
All research outputs
#586,156
of 12,417,665 outputs
Outputs from Public Health Nutrition
#220
of 2,108 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,640
of 271,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Public Health Nutrition
#8
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,417,665 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,108 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,101 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.