↓ Skip to main content

Slow climate velocities of mountain streams portend their role as refugia for cold-water biodiversity

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
44 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
75 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
170 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Slow climate velocities of mountain streams portend their role as refugia for cold-water biodiversity
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1522429113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel J. Isaak, Michael K. Young, Charles H. Luce, Steven W. Hostetler, Seth J. Wenger, Erin E. Peterson, Jay M. Ver Hoef, Matthew C. Groce, Dona L. Horan, David E. Nagel

Abstract

The imminent demise of montane species is a recurrent theme in the climate change literature, particularly for aquatic species that are constrained to networks and elevational rather than latitudinal retreat as temperatures increase. Predictions of widespread species losses, however, have yet to be fulfilled despite decades of climate change, suggesting that trends are much weaker than anticipated and may be too subtle for detection given the widespread use of sparse water temperature datasets or imprecise surrogates like elevation and air temperature. Through application of large water-temperature databases evaluated for sensitivity to historical air-temperature variability and computationally interpolated to provide high-resolution thermal habitat information for a 222,000-km network, we estimate a less dire thermal plight for cold-water species within mountains of the northwestern United States. Stream warming rates and climate velocities were both relatively low for 1968-2011 (average warming rate = 0.101 °C/decade; median velocity = 1.07 km/decade) when air temperatures warmed at 0.21 °C/decade. Many cold-water vertebrate species occurred in a subset of the network characterized by low climate velocities, and three native species of conservation concern occurred in extremely cold, slow velocity environments (0.33-0.48 km/decade). Examination of aggressive warming scenarios indicated that although network climate velocities could increase, they remain low in headwaters because of strong local temperature gradients associated with topographic controls. Better information about changing hydrology and disturbance regimes is needed to complement these results, but rather than being climatic cul-de-sacs, many mountain streams appear poised to be redoubts for cold-water biodiversity this century.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 44 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 170 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 156 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 52 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 21%
Student > Master 33 19%
Unspecified 11 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 28 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 62 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 32%
Unspecified 22 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 10%
Engineering 4 2%
Other 10 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 137. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2016.
All research outputs
#100,163
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,416
of 79,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,134
of 264,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#131
of 915 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,114 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 915 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.