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The Role of Cholesterol in Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 16,188)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
twitter
10 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
257 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
307 Mendeley
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Title
The Role of Cholesterol in Cancer
Published in
Cancer Research, April 2016
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-15-2613
Pubmed ID
Authors

Omer F. Kuzu, Mohammad A. Noory, Gavin P. Robertson

Abstract

The roles played by cholesterol in cancer development and the potential of therapeutically targeting cholesterol homeostasis is a controversial area in the cancer community. Several epidemiologic studies report an association between cancer and serum cholesterol levels or statin use, while others suggest that there is not one. Furthermore, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project using next-generation sequencing has profiled the mutational status and expression levels of all the genes in diverse cancers, including those involved in cholesterol metabolism, providing correlative support for a role of the cholesterol pathway in cancer development. Finally, preclinical studies tend to more consistently support the role of cholesterol in cancer, with several demonstrating that cholesterol homeostasis genes can modulate development. Because of space limitations, this review provides selected examples of the epidemiologic, TCGA, and preclinical data, focusing on alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and its consequent effect on patient survival. In melanoma, this focused analysis demonstrated that enhanced expression of cholesterol synthesis genes was associated with decreased patient survival. Collectively, the studies in melanoma and other cancer types suggested a potential role of disrupted cholesterol homeostasis in cancer development but additional studies are needed to link population-based epidemiological data, the TCGA database results, and preclinical mechanistic evidence to concretely resolve this controversy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2063-70. ©2016 AACR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 307 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 304 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 66 21%
Researcher 47 15%
Student > Master 38 12%
Student > Bachelor 26 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 6%
Other 48 16%
Unknown 63 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 85 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 14%
Chemistry 17 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 4%
Other 35 11%
Unknown 75 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 250. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2021.
All research outputs
#90,944
of 19,458,329 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#45
of 16,188 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,178
of 275,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#2
of 220 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,458,329 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,188 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,125 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 220 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.