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Influence of Manatees' Diving on Their Risk of Collision with Watercraft

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Influence of Manatees' Diving on Their Risk of Collision with Watercraft
Published in
PLOS ONE, April 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0151450
Pubmed ID
Authors

Holly H. Edwards, Julien Martin, Charles J. Deutsch, Robert G. Muller, Stacie M. Koslovsky, Alexander J. Smith, Margaret E. Barlas

Abstract

Watercraft pose a threat to endangered Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). Mortality from watercraft collisions has adversely impacted the manatee population's growth rate, therefore reducing this threat is an important management goal. To assess factors that contribute to the risk of watercraft strikes to manatees, we studied the diving behavior of nine manatees carrying GPS tags and time-depth recorders in Tampa Bay, Florida, during winters 2002-2006. We applied a Bayesian formulation of generalized linear mixed models to depth data to model the probability (Pt) that manatees would be no deeper than 1.25 m from the water's surface as a function of behavioral and habitat covariates. Manatees above this threshold were considered to be within striking depth of a watercraft. Seventy-eight percent of depth records (individual range 62-86%) were within striking depth (mean = 1.09 m, max = 16.20 m), illustrating how vulnerable manatees are to strikes. In some circumstances manatees made consecutive dives to the bottom while traveling, even in areas >14 m, possibly to conserve energy. This is the first documentation of potential cost-efficient diving behavior in manatees. Manatees were at higher risk of being within striking depth in shallow water (<0.91 m), over seagrass, at night, and while stationary or moving slowly; they were less likely to be within striking depth when ≤50 m from a charted waterway. In shallow water the probability of a manatee being within striking depth was 0.96 (CI = 0.93-0.98) and decreased as water depth increased. The probability was greater over seagrass (Pt = 0.96, CI = 0.93-0.98) than over other substrates (Pt = 0.73, CI = 0.58-0.84). Quantitative approaches to assessing risk can improve the effectiveness of manatee conservation measures by helping identify areas for protection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Peru 1 2%
Unknown 53 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 24%
Researcher 12 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 15%
Student > Master 7 13%
Other 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 47%
Environmental Science 9 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2022.
All research outputs
#3,950,803
of 22,479,668 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#55,822
of 192,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,932
of 281,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#1,452
of 5,309 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,479,668 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 192,210 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,827 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,309 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.