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Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, March 2012
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Title
Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, March 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1462-2920.2012.02725.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruo He, Matthew J. Wooller, John W. Pohlman, Catharine Catranis, John Quensen, James M. Tiedje, Mary Beth Leigh

Abstract

Arctic lakes are a significant source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH(4) ), but the role that methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play in limiting the overall CH(4) flux is poorly understood. Here, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques to identify the metabolically active aerobic methanotrophs in upper sediments (0-1 cm) from an arctic lake in northern Alaska sampled during ice-free summer conditions. The highest CH(4) oxidation potential was observed in the upper sediment (0-1 cm depth) with 1.59 µmol g wet weight(-1) day(-1) compared with the deeper sediment samples (1-3 cm, 3-5 cm and 5-10 cm), which exhibited CH(4) oxidation potentials below 0.4 µmol g wet weight(-1) day(-1) . Both type I and type II methanotrophs were directly detected in the upper sediment total communities using targeted primer sets based on 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and functional genes (pmoA and mxaF) in the (13) C-DNA from the upper sediment indicated that type I methanotrophs, mainly Methylobacter, Methylosoma, Methylomonas and Methylovulum miyakonense, dominated the assimilation of CH(4) . Methylotrophs, including the genera Methylophilus and/or Methylotenera, were also abundant in the (13) C-DNA. Our results show that a diverse microbial consortium acquired carbon from CH(4) in the sediments of this arctic lake.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 5%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Germany 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 107 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 37%
Researcher 22 18%
Student > Master 15 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 4%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 37%
Environmental Science 27 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 5%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 15 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2012.
All research outputs
#10,943,144
of 12,348,046 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#2,430
of 2,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,282
of 114,862 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#26
of 32 outputs
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