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Comparative ethnobotany of the Wakhi agropastoralist and the Kyrgyz nomads of Afghanistan

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, January 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Comparative ethnobotany of the Wakhi agropastoralist and the Kyrgyz nomads of Afghanistan
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0063-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jens Soelberg, Anna K. Jäger, Soelberg, Jens, Jäger, Anna K

Abstract

The mountainous Wakhan and Pamir in northeastern Afghanistan is one of the most isolated yet inhabited places in Asia. It is home to the agropastoralist Wakhi and the last Afghan semi-nomadic Kyrgyz. We present a study of plant names and uses, along with comparisons of plant name etymology, origins of plant resources, intra- and intercultural exchanges and relations, and the relative availability of the known and used plants. The fieldwork was conducted as an expedition in the summer of 2010, and visited settlements and pastures in Upper Wakhan and Big and Little Pamir. Semi-structured group interviews, talks and observations gave initial data on names, uses and the relative availability of used plants, and provided foundation for individual interviews using an interview-herbarium containing vouchers of the 72 most frequently used plants or plant groups. Wakhi and Kyrgyz plant names are recorded in western transcription, the new Wakhi alphabet, phonetically and in Cyrillic. The present study documents a large body of endemic, indigenous plant knowledge; on crops, fuel, fodder, cosmetics, dyes, vegetables, veterinary medicine, traditional medicines and other plant uses which sustain life in Wakhan and Pamir. Overall, the Wakhi use considerably more plants than the Kyrgyz, and their materia medica and use thereof is more complex. Although the Wakhi and Kyrgyz are close neighbours, there are few indications of direct knowledge transfer between them. Most shared plant uses are strictly necessary for survival in the mountains. While there are few differences between genders and cultural subgroups within the two cultures, the Wakhi and Kyrgyz exhibit great differences both in their total number of use-plants and the distance from which they obtain them. The agropastoralist Wakhi appear to have their basic needs for wild natural resources covered within half a days travel, while the relatively plant-derived environment of the high Pamir appears to have necessitated the nomadic Kyrgyz to adapt by developing uses and obtaining plants that are comparatively remote. The comparative differences in plant uses between the agropastoralist Wakhi and nomadic Kyrgyz appear to be accentuated by an environment at the extreme of what is humanly possible.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 7 16%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 32%
Environmental Science 8 18%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Chemistry 3 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,430,198
of 8,569,995 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#221
of 496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,386
of 279,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#5
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,569,995 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 496 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,215 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.