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A Model to Inform Management Actions as a Response to Chytridiomycosis-Associated Decline

Overview of attention for article published in EcoHealth, April 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
A Model to Inform Management Actions as a Response to Chytridiomycosis-Associated Decline
Published in
EcoHealth, April 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10393-016-1117-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah J. Converse, Larissa L. Bailey, Brittany A. Mosher, W. Chris Funk, Brian D. Gerber, Erin Muths

Abstract

Decision-analytic models provide forecasts of how systems of interest will respond to management. These models can be parameterized using empirical data, but sometimes require information elicited from experts. When evaluating the effects of disease in species translocation programs, expert judgment is likely to play a role because complete empirical information will rarely be available. We illustrate development of a decision-analytic model built to inform decision-making regarding translocations and other management actions for the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas boreas), a species with declines linked to chytridiomycosis caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Using the model, we explored the management implications of major uncertainties in this system, including whether there is a genetic basis for resistance to pathogenic infection by Bd, how translocation can best be implemented, and the effectiveness of efforts to reduce the spread of Bd. Our modeling exercise suggested that while selection for resistance to pathogenic infection by Bd could increase numbers of sites occupied by toads, and translocations could increase the rate of toad recovery, efforts to reduce the spread of Bd may have little effect. We emphasize the need to continue developing and parameterizing models necessary to assess management actions for combating chytridiomycosis-associated declines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 22%
Student > Master 10 20%
Researcher 8 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 55%
Environmental Science 9 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2020.
All research outputs
#10,335,116
of 18,846,097 outputs
Outputs from EcoHealth
#413
of 656 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,610
of 273,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EcoHealth
#13
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,846,097 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 656 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,426 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.