↓ Skip to main content

Conservation Value of Non-Native Banteng in Northern Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Conservation Biology, February 2006
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Conservation Value of Non-Native Banteng in Northern Australia
Published in
Conservation Biology, February 2006
DOI 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2006.00428.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

COREY J. A. BRADSHAW, YUJI ISAGI, SHINGO KANEKO, DAVID M. J. S. BOWMAN, BARRY W. BROOK

Abstract

The global species extinction crisis has provided the impetus for elaborate translocation, captive breeding, and cloning programs, but more extreme actions may be necessary. We used mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, and nuclear lactoferrin-encoding gene sequencing to identify a wild population of a pure-strain endangered bovid (Bos javanicus) introduced into northern Australia over 150 years ago. This places the Australian population in a different conservation category relative to its domesticated conspecific in Indonesia (i.e., Bali cattle) that has varying degrees of introgression from other domesticated Bos spp. The success of this endangered non-native species demonstrates that although risky, the deliberate introduction of threatened exotic species into non-native habitat may provide, under some circumstances, a biologically feasible option for conserving large herbivores otherwise imperiled in their native range.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 3%
Germany 1 1%
Thailand 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 69 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 25%
Student > Master 13 17%
Professor 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Other 6 8%
Other 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 61%
Environmental Science 17 22%
Unspecified 7 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Mathematics 1 1%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2012.
All research outputs
#1,336,478
of 12,348,877 outputs
Outputs from Conservation Biology
#872
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,367
of 115,523 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Conservation Biology
#3
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,877 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 115,523 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.