↓ Skip to main content

Adipokines and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Normal Human Breast Tissue in Vivo – Correlations and Attenuation by Dietary Flaxseed

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
6 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Adipokines and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Normal Human Breast Tissue in Vivo – Correlations and Attenuation by Dietary Flaxseed
Published in
Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia, April 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10911-016-9352-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Morad, Vivian, Abrahamsson, Annelie, Kjölhede, Preben, Dabrosin, Charlotta, Vivian Morad, Annelie Abrahamsson, Preben Kjölhede, Charlotta Dabrosin

Abstract

Exposure to sex steroids increases the risk of breast cancer but the exact mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Events in the microenvironment are important for carcinogenesis. Diet containing phytoestrogens can affect the breast microenvironment and alter the risk of breast cancer. It has previously been shown that estrogen regulates extracellular levels of leptin, adiponectin, and VEGF in normal breast tissue in vivo. Whether these proteins correlate in breast tissue in vivo or if diet addition of flaxseed, a major source of phytoestrogens in Western diets, alters adipokine levels in breast tissue are unknown. We used microdialysis to sample proteins of normal human breast tissue and abdominal subcutaneous fat in situ in 34 pre-and postmenopausal women. In vitro, co-culture of breast cancer cells and primary human adipocytes was used. In vivo, in normal breast tissue, a significant positive correlation between VEGF and leptin was detected. No correlations were found in fat tissue. Co-culture of adipocytes and breast cancer cells per se increased the secretion of VEGF and leptin and enhanced the effects of estradiol compared to culture of either cell type alone. In vitro, inhibition of VEGF diminished the release of leptin while inhibition of leptin had no influence on VEGF secretion. The levels of leptin decreased and adiponectin increased after a dietary addition of 25 g of flaxseed/day for one menstrual cycle. We conclude that VEGF and leptin correlate significantly in normal human breast tissue in vivo and that dietary addition of flaxseed affect adipokine levels in the breast.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 33%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 33%
Unspecified 2 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2016.
All research outputs
#7,508,063
of 9,739,671 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia
#116
of 154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,599
of 280,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,739,671 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 154 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,791 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.