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Atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia in older adults: a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, April 2016
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9 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia in older adults: a population-based cohort study
Published in
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40697-016-0111-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sonja Gandhi, Eric McArthur, Jeffrey P. Reiss, Muhammad M. Mamdani, Daniel G. Hackam, Matthew A. Weir, Amit X. Garg

Abstract

A number of case reports have suggested a possible association between atypical antipsychotic medications and hyponatremia. Currently, there are no reliable estimates of hyponatremia risk from atypical antipsychotic drugs. The objective of this study was to examine the 30-day risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia in older adults dispensed an atypical antipsychotic drug relative to no antipsychotic use. The design of this study was a retrospective, population-based cohort study. The setting of this study was in Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2012. Adults 65 years or older with an identified psychiatric condition who were newly dispensed risperidone, olanzapine, or quetiapine in the community setting compared to adults with similar indicators of baseline health who were not dispensed such a prescription. The primary outcome was the 30-day risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia. The tracer outcome (an outcome that is not expected to be influenced by the study drugs) was the 30-day risk of hospitalization with bowel obstruction. These outcomes were assessed using hospital diagnosis codes. Using health administrative data, we applied a propensity score technique to match antipsychotic users 1:1 to non-users of antipsychotic drugs (58,008 patients in each group). We used conditional logistic regression to compare outcomes among the matched users and non-users. A total of 104 baseline characteristics were well-balanced between the two matched groups. Atypical antipsychotic use compared to non-use was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization with hyponatremia within 30 days (86/58,008 (0.15 %) versus 53/58,008 (0.09 %); relative risk 1.62 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.15 to 2.29); absolute risk increase 0.06 % (95 % CI 0.02 to 0.10)). The limited number of events precluded some additional analyses to confirm if the association was robust. Atypical antipsychotic use compared to non-use was not associated with hospitalization with bowel obstruction within 30 days (55/58,008 (0.09 %) versus 44/58,008 (0.08 %); relative risk 1.25 (95 % CI 0.84 to 1.86)). We could only study older adults within our data sources. In this study, the use of an atypical antipsychotic was associated with a modest but statistically significant increase in the 30-day risk of a hospitalization with hyponatremia. The association was less pronounced than that described with other psychotropic drugs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Other 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 6 26%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 61%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,888,863
of 14,644,269 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#118
of 268 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,518
of 262,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#2
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,644,269 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 268 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,836 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.