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The People with Asperger syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) trial: a pilot multicentre, single-blind randomised trial of group cognitive–behavioural therapy

Overview of attention for article published in BJPsych Open, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
The People with Asperger syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) trial: a pilot multicentre, single-blind randomised trial of group cognitive–behavioural therapy
Published in
BJPsych Open, January 2018
DOI 10.1192/bjpo.bp.115.002527
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter E. Langdon, Glynis H. Murphy, Lee Shepstone, Edward C.F. Wilson, David Fowler, David Heavens, Alexandra Russell, Alice Rose, Aida Malovic, Louise Mullineaux

Abstract

There is a growing interest in using cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) with people who have Asperger syndrome and comorbid mental health problems. To examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an Asperger syndrome population is feasible and likely to be efficacious. Using a randomised assessor-blind trial, 52 individuals with Asperger syndrome were randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. After 24 weeks, those in the waiting-list control arm received treatment, while those initially randomised to treatment were followed up for 24 weeks. The conversion rate for this trial was high (1.6:1), while attrition was 13%. After 24 weeks, there was no significant difference between those randomised to the treatment arm compared with those randomised to the waiting-list control arm on the primary outcome measure, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety. Trials of psychological therapies with this population are feasible. Larger definitive trials are now needed. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 27%
Unspecified 5 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 50%
Unspecified 6 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,262,374
of 13,728,230 outputs
Outputs from BJPsych Open
#110
of 298 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,819
of 263,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BJPsych Open
#6
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,728,230 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 298 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,126 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.