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Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
38 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
88 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
204 Mendeley
Title
Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance
Published in
Nature, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature17407
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin A. Feeney, Louise L. Hansen, Marrit Putker, Consuelo Olivares-Yañez, Jason Day, Lorna J. Eades, Luis F. Larrondo, Nathaniel P. Hoyle, John S. O’Neill, Gerben van Ooijen

Abstract

Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behaviour and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes. A fundamental knowledge gap exists, however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg(2+)]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties both in a human cell line and in a unicellular alga that diverged from each other more than 1 billion years ago. Given the essential role of Mg(2+) as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg(2+)]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg(2+) availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell's more than 600 MgATP-dependent enzymes and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR is regulated through [Mg(2+)]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 88 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 204 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 195 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 23%
Researcher 39 19%
Student > Bachelor 24 12%
Student > Master 21 10%
Other 16 8%
Other 50 25%
Unknown 7 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 62 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 7%
Neuroscience 12 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 4%
Other 25 12%
Unknown 15 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 360. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2019.
All research outputs
#32,055
of 13,804,624 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#3,578
of 70,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,273
of 263,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#156
of 1,000 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,804,624 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70,671 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 77.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,000 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.