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Ectopic shoot meristem generation in monocotyledonous rpk1 mutants is linked to SAM loss and altered seedling morphology

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, July 2015
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Title
Ectopic shoot meristem generation in monocotyledonous rpk1 mutants is linked to SAM loss and altered seedling morphology
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12870-015-0556-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Birgit S. Fiesselmann, Miriam Luichtl, Xiaomeng Yang, Michaela Matthes, Ottilie Peis, Ramon A. Torres-Ruiz

Abstract

In dicot Arabidopsis thaliana embryos two cotyledons develop largely autonomously from the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Recessive mutations in the Arabidopsis receptor-like kinase RPK1 lead to monocotyledonous seedlings, with low (10 %) penetrance due to complex functional redundancy. In strong rpk1 alleles, about 10 % of these (i. e. 1 % of all homozygotes) did not develop a SAM. We wondered whether RPK1 might also control SAM gene expression and SAM generation in addition to its known stochastic impact on cell division and PINFORMED1 (PIN1) polarity in the epidermis. SAM-less seedlings developed a simple morphology with a straight and continuous hypocotyl-cotyledon structure lacking a recognizable epicotyl. According to rpk1's auxin-related PIN1 defect, the seedlings displayed defects in the vascular tissue. Surprisingly, SAM-less seedlings variably expressed essential SAM specific genes along the hypocotyl-cotyledon structure up into the cotyledon lamina. Few were even capable of developing an ectopic shoot meristem (eSM) on top of the cotyledon. The results highlight the developmental autonomy of the SAM vs. cotyledons and suggest that the primary rpk1 defect does not lie in the seedling's ability to express SAM genes or to develop a shoot meristem. Rather, rpk1's known defects in cell division and auxin homeostasis, by disturbed PIN1 polarity, impact on SAM and organ generation. In early embryo stages this failure generates a simplified monocotyledonous morphology. Once generated, this likely entails a loss of positional information that in turn affects the spatiotemporal development of the SAM. SAM-bearing and SAM-less monocotyledonous phenotypes show morphological similarities either to real monocots or to dicot species, which only develop one cotyledon. The specific cotyledon defect in rpk1 mutants thus sheds light upon the developmental implications of the transition from two cotyledons to one.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 20%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Energy 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,540,493
of 7,551,260 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#869
of 1,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#227,464
of 269,824 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#53
of 63 outputs
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