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Impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep-water coral community in the Gulf of Mexico

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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260 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
489 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep-water coral community in the Gulf of Mexico
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1118029109
Pubmed ID
Authors

H. K. White, P.-Y. Hsing, W. Cho, T. M. Shank, E. E. Cordes, A. M. Quattrini, R. K. Nelson, R. Camilli, A. W. J. Demopoulos, C. R. German, J. M. Brooks, H. H. Roberts, W. Shedd, C. M. Reddy, C. R. Fisher

Abstract

To assess the potential impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on offshore ecosystems, 11 sites hosting deep-water coral communities were examined 3 to 4 mo after the well was capped. Healthy coral communities were observed at all sites >20 km from the Macondo well, including seven sites previously visited in September 2009, where the corals and communities appeared unchanged. However, at one site 11 km southwest of the Macondo well, coral colonies presented widespread signs of stress, including varying degrees of tissue loss, sclerite enlargement, excess mucous production, bleached commensal ophiuroids, and covering by brown flocculent material (floc). On the basis of these criteria the level of impact to individual colonies was ranked from 0 (least impact) to 4 (greatest impact). Of the 43 corals imaged at that site, 46% exhibited evidence of impact on more than half of the colony, whereas nearly a quarter of all of the corals showed impact to >90% of the colony. Additionally, 53% of these corals' ophiuroid associates displayed abnormal color and/or attachment posture. Analysis of hopanoid petroleum biomarkers isolated from the floc provides strong evidence that this material contained oil from the Macondo well. The presence of recently damaged and deceased corals beneath the path of a previously documented plume emanating from the Macondo well provides compelling evidence that the oil impacted deep-water ecosystems. Our findings underscore the unprecedented nature of the spill in terms of its magnitude, release at depth, and impact to deep-water ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 489 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 2%
United Kingdom 6 1%
Canada 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 467 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 107 22%
Researcher 90 18%
Student > Master 75 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 15%
Other 17 3%
Other 62 13%
Unknown 64 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 159 33%
Environmental Science 99 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 49 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 6%
Chemistry 20 4%
Other 56 11%
Unknown 76 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 200. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2021.
All research outputs
#120,337
of 19,178,874 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,713
of 92,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#481
of 136,732 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#18
of 850 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,178,874 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 92,436 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 136,732 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 850 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.