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Large carbon isotope fractionation associated with oxidation of methyl halides by methylotrophic bacteria

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2001
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

patent
1 patent

Citations

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56 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
Title
Large carbon isotope fractionation associated with oxidation of methyl halides by methylotrophic bacteria
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2001
DOI 10.1073/pnas.101129798
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. G. Miller, R. M. Kalin, S. E. McCauley, J. T. G. Hamilton, D. B. Harper, D. B. Millet, R. S. Oremland, A. H. Goldstein

Abstract

The largest biological fractionations of stable carbon isotopes observed in nature occur during production of methane by methanogenic archaea. These fractionations result in substantial (as much as approximately 70 per thousand) shifts in delta(13)C relative to the initial substrate. We now report that a stable carbon isotopic fractionation of comparable magnitude (up to 70 per thousand) occurs during oxidation of methyl halides by methylotrophic bacteria. We have demonstrated biological fractionation with whole cells of three methylotrophs (strain IMB-1, strain CC495, and strain MB2) and, to a lesser extent, with the purified cobalamin-dependent methyltransferase enzyme obtained from strain CC495. Thus, the genetic similarities recently reported between methylotrophs, and methanogens with respect to their pathways for C(1)-unit metabolism are also reflected in the carbon isotopic fractionations achieved by these organisms. We found that only part of the observed fractionation of carbon isotopes could be accounted for by the activity of the corrinoid methyltransferase enzyme, suggesting fractionation by enzymes further along the degradation pathway. These observations are of potential biogeochemical significance in the application of stable carbon isotope ratios to constrain the tropospheric budgets for the ozone-depleting halocarbons, methyl bromide and methyl chloride.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Uruguay 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 57 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 23%
Student > Master 6 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Professor 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 6 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 21 34%
Environmental Science 15 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 21%
Chemistry 3 5%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2005.
All research outputs
#2,821,604
of 10,502,506 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#33,228
of 66,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,549
of 279,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#657
of 955 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,502,506 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 66,135 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 955 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.