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Vitamin D status and parathyroid hormone relationship in adolescents and its association with bone health parameters: analysis of the Northern Ireland Young Heart’s Project

Overview of attention for article published in Osteoporosis International, May 2009
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Vitamin D status and parathyroid hormone relationship in adolescents and its association with bone health parameters: analysis of the Northern Ireland Young Heart’s Project
Published in
Osteoporosis International, May 2009
DOI 10.1007/s00198-009-0959-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. R. Hill, A. A. Cotter, S. Mitchell, C. A. Boreham, W. Dubitzky, L. Murray, J. J. Strain, A. Flynn, P. J. Robson, J. M. W. Wallace, M. Kiely, K. D. Cashman

Abstract

In girls, a plateau in parathyroid hormone (PTH) was observed at a 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration of approximately 60 nmol/l. In boys, there was no plateau in PTH concentrations as 25(OH)D concentration increased. A 25(OH)D threshold of 60 nmol/l appears to have implications for bone health outcomes in both girls and boys. Our objective was to investigate if there is a threshold 25(OH)D concentration where a plateau in PTH concentration is evident and to examine the impact of this relationship on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover in a representative sample of adolescents. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 1,015 Northern Irish adolescents aged 12 and 15 years. Serum 25(OH)D, PTH, osteocalcin, type 1 collagen cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTx), and BMD of the nondominant forearm and heel were measured. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to model the association between 25(OH)D and PTH. In girls, a plateau in PTH was observed at a 25(OH)D concentration of approximately 60 nmol/l (PTH = 47.146 + 370.314 x exp((-0.092 x 25(OH)D))) while no plateau in PTH was observed in boys (PTH = 42.144 + 56.366 x exp((-0.022 x 25(OH)D))). Subjects with 25(OH)D levels <60 nmol/l had significantly higher osteocalcin concentrations (P < 0.05) compared with those who had >or=60 nmol/l, while no significant (P > 0.05) differences were noted for CTx concentrations. In girls only, nondominant forearm BMD but not heel BMD was significantly higher (P = 0.046) in those with 25(OH)D concentrations >or= 60 nmol/l. Serum 25(OH)D levels above 60 nmol/l in Northern Irish adolescent girls prevent an increase in serum PTH levels and maintaining 25(OH)D >60 nmol/l in both girls and boys may lead to improved bone health outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 10 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2020.
All research outputs
#7,471,856
of 22,862,742 outputs
Outputs from Osteoporosis International
#1,340
of 3,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,672
of 92,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Osteoporosis International
#11
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,862,742 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,615 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 92,448 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.