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Sex stereotypes influence adults’ perception of babies’ cries

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 382)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
45 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
58 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
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Title
Sex stereotypes influence adults’ perception of babies’ cries
Published in
BMC Psychology, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40359-016-0123-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Reby, Florence Levréro, Erik Gustafsson, Nicolas Mathevon

Abstract

Despite widespread evidence that gender stereotypes influence human parental behavior, their potential effects on adults' perception of babies' cries have been overlooked. In particular, whether adult listeners overgeneralize the sex dimorphism that characterizes the voice of adult speakers (men are lower-pitched than women) to their perception of babies' cries has not been investigated. We used playback experiments combining natural and re-synthesised cries of 3 month-old babies to investigate whether the interindividual variation in the fundamental frequency (pitch) of cries affected adult listeners' identification of the baby's sex, their perception the baby's femininity and masculinity, and whether these biases interacted with their perception of the level of discomfort expressed by the cry. We show that low-pitched cries are more likely to be attributed to boys and high-pitched cries to girls, despite the absence of sex differences in pitch. Moreover, low-pitched boys are perceived as more masculine and high-pitched girls are perceived as more feminine. Finally, adult men rate relatively low-pitched cries as expressing more discomfort when presented as belonging to boys than to girls. Such biases in caregivers' responses to babies' cries may have implications on children's immediate welfare and on the development of their gender identity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 3%
United States 1 3%
France 1 3%
Unknown 35 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Master 6 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 8 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 32%
Social Sciences 4 11%
Neuroscience 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 436. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2020.
All research outputs
#29,811
of 15,883,046 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#3
of 382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#955
of 266,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,883,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 382 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them