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Quality of life in young onset dementia: an updated systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, March 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

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24 Dimensions

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Title
Quality of life in young onset dementia: an updated systematic review
Published in
Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, March 2016
DOI 10.1590/2237-6089-2015-0049
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Alice Tourinho Baptista, Raquel Luiza Santos, Nathália Kimura, Isabel Barbeito Lacerda, Aud Johannenssen, Maria Lage Barca, Knut Engedal, Marcia Cristina Nascimento Dourado

Abstract

Introduction Young onset dementia (YOD) develops before 65 years of age and has specific age-related adverse consequences for quality of life (QoL). We systematically examined factors related to the QoL of people with YOD and their caregivers. Method This systematic review used the PRISMA methodology. The literature search was undertaken on July 5, 2015, using Cochrane, PubMed, SciELO, PsycINFO, Scopus and Thomson Reuters Web of Science electronic databases. The search keywords included early onset and young onset combined with, dementia, Alzheimer, vascular dementia, mixed dementia, frontotemporal dementia, quality of life, well-being and unmet needs. Nine studies were included. We revised objectives, study design, sample, instruments and results related to QoL. Results People with YOD rated their own QoL significantly higher than their caregivers. Greater awareness of disease among people with YOD is associated with better QoL in caregivers. A relationship was found between unmet needs and daytime activities, lack of companionship and difficulties with memory. Issues associated with unmet needs were prolonged time to diagnosis, available health services and lack of caregiver's own future perspective. Conclusion Consideration should be given to conducting investigations with more homogeneous samples and use of a clear concept of QoL. The present study highlights the need for future research in a wider range of countries, using instruments specifically for YOD. It would be interesting if studies could trace parallels with late onset dementia groups.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unknown 44 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2016.
All research outputs
#794,246
of 12,538,502 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#1
of 72 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,928
of 220,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,502 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 72 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them