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The impact of post-exercise hydration with deep-ocean mineral water on rehydration and exercise performance

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of post-exercise hydration with deep-ocean mineral water on rehydration and exercise performance
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12970-016-0129-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Douglas A. Keen, Eleni Constantopoulos, John P. Konhilas

Abstract

Dehydration caused by prolonged exercise impairs thermoregulation, endurance and exercise performance. Evidence from animal and human studies validates the potential of desalinated deep-ocean mineral water to positively impact physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we hypothesize that deep-ocean mineral water drawn from a depth of 915 m off the Kona, HI coast enhances recovery of hydration and exercise performance following a dehydrating exercise protocol compared to mountain spring water and a carbohydrate-based sports drink. Subjects (n = 8) were exposed to an exercise-dehydration protocol (stationary biking) under warm conditions (30 °C) to achieve a body mass loss of 3 % (93.4 ± 21.7 total exercise time). During the post-exercise recovery period, subjects received deep-ocean mineral water (Kona), mountain spring water (Spring) or a carbohydrate-based sports drink (Sports) at a volume (in L) equivalent to body mass loss (in Kg). Salivary samples were collected at regular intervals during exercise and post-exercise rehydration. Additionally, each participant performed peak torque knee extension as a measure of lower body muscle performance. Subjects who received Kona during the rehydrating period showed a significantly more rapid return to pre-exercise (baseline) hydration state, measured as the rate of decline in peak to baseline salivary osmolality, compared to Sports and Spring groups. In addition, subjects demonstrated significantly improved recovery of lower body muscle performance following rehydration with Kona versus Sports or Spring groups. Deep-ocean mineral water shows promise as an optimal rehydrating source over spring water and/or sports drink.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Ireland 1 1%
France 1 1%
Norway 1 1%
Unknown 88 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 23%
Student > Bachelor 15 16%
Other 6 7%
Researcher 6 7%
Lecturer 5 5%
Other 23 25%
Unknown 16 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 27 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 18 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2019.
All research outputs
#500,824
of 15,918,484 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#166
of 752 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,143
of 216,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,484 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 752 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,238 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them