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Physical and neurobehavioral determinants of reproductive onset and success

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Genetics, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 6,653)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
126 news outlets
blogs
16 blogs
twitter
167 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
83 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
188 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Physical and neurobehavioral determinants of reproductive onset and success
Published in
Nature Genetics, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/ng.3551
Pubmed ID
Authors

Felix R Day, Hannes Helgason, Daniel I Chasman, Lynda M Rose, Po-Ru Loh, Robert A Scott, Agnar Helgason, Augustine Kong, Gisli Masson, Olafur Th Magnusson, Daniel Gudbjartsson, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Julie E Buring, Paul M Ridker, Patrick Sulem, Kari Stefansson, Ken K Ong, John R B Perry

Abstract

The ages of puberty, first sexual intercourse and first birth signify the onset of reproductive ability, behavior and success, respectively. In a genome-wide association study of 125,667 UK Biobank participants, we identify 38 loci associated (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with age at first sexual intercourse. These findings were taken forward in 241,910 men and women from Iceland and 20,187 women from the Women's Genome Health Study. Several of the identified loci also exhibit associations (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with other reproductive and behavioral traits, including age at first birth (variants in or near ESR1 and RBM6-SEMA3F), number of children (CADM2 and ESR1), irritable temperament (MSRA) and risk-taking propensity (CADM2). Mendelian randomization analyses infer causal influences of earlier puberty timing on earlier first sexual intercourse, earlier first birth and lower educational attainment. In turn, likely causal consequences of earlier first sexual intercourse include reproductive, educational, psychiatric and cardiometabolic outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 167 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
United Kingdom 3 2%
Spain 2 1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Unknown 173 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 42 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 20%
Student > Master 22 12%
Student > Bachelor 17 9%
Student > Postgraduate 13 7%
Other 38 20%
Unknown 18 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 12%
Psychology 21 11%
Social Sciences 13 7%
Other 31 16%
Unknown 24 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1203. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2020.
All research outputs
#5,623
of 17,415,680 outputs
Outputs from Nature Genetics
#11
of 6,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118
of 269,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Genetics
#2
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,415,680 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,985 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.