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Identification methods of key contributing factors in crashes with high numbers of fatalities and injuries in China

Overview of attention for article published in Traffic Injury Prevention, April 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
Title
Identification methods of key contributing factors in crashes with high numbers of fatalities and injuries in China
Published in
Traffic Injury Prevention, April 2016
DOI 10.1080/15389588.2016.1174774
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yikai Chen, Yiming Li, Mark King, Qin Shi, Changjun Wang, Pingfan Li

Abstract

In China, "serious road traffic crashes" (SRTCs) are those in which there are 10-30 fatalities, 50-100 serious injuries or a total cost of 50-100 million RMB ($US8-16m), and "particularly serious road traffic crashes" (PSRTCs) are those which are more severe or costly. Due to the large number of fatalities and injuries as well as the negative public reaction they elicit, SRTCs and PSRTCs have become great concerns to China during recent years. The aim of this study is to identify the main factors contributing to these road traffic crashes and to propose preventive measures to reduce their number. 49 contributing factors of the SRTCs and PSRTCs that occurred from 2007 to 2013 were collected from the database "In-depth Investigation and Analysis System for Major Road traffic crashes" (IIASMRTC) and were analyzed through the integrated use of principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering to determine the primary and secondary groups of contributing factors. Speeding and overloading of passengers were the primary contributing factors, featuring in up to 66.3% and 32.6% of accidents respectively. Two secondary contributing factors were road-related: lack of or nonstandard roadside safety infrastructure, and slippery roads due to rain, snow or ice. The current approach to SRTCs and PSRTCs is focused on the attribution of responsibility and the enforcement of regulations considered relevant to particular SRTCs and PSRTCs. It would be more effective to investigate contributing factors and characteristics of SRTCs and PSRTCs as a whole, to provide adequate information for safety interventions in regions where SRTCs and PSRTCs are more common. In addition to mandating of a driver training program and publicisation of the hazards associated with traffic violations, implementation of speed cameras, speed signs, markings and vehicle-mounted GPS are suggested to reduce speeding of passenger vehicles, while increasing regular checks by traffic police and passenger station staff, and improving transportation management to increase income of contractors and drivers are feasible measures to prevent overloading of people. Other promising measures include regular inspection of roadside safety infrastructure, and improving skid resistance on dangerous road sections in mountainous areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 20%
Student > Master 5 20%
Lecturer 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 7 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 16%
Engineering 4 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Computer Science 2 8%
Other 5 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,755,562
of 11,312,832 outputs
Outputs from Traffic Injury Prevention
#346
of 940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,030
of 277,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Traffic Injury Prevention
#6
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,312,832 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 940 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.