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Vision in elasmobranchs and their relatives: 21st century advances

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Fish Biology, March 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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127 Mendeley
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Title
Vision in elasmobranchs and their relatives: 21st century advances
Published in
Journal of Fish Biology, March 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2012.03253.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. J. Lisney, S. M. Theiss, S. P. Collin, N. S. Hart

Abstract

This review identifies a number of exciting new developments in the understanding of vision in cartilaginous fishes that have been made since the turn of the century. These include the results of studies on various aspects of the visual system including eye size, visual fields, eye design and the optical system, retinal topography and spatial resolving power, visual pigments, spectral sensitivity and the potential for colour vision. A number of these studies have covered a broad range of species, thereby providing valuable information on how the visual systems of these fishes are adapted to different environmental conditions. For example, oceanic and deep-sea sharks have the largest eyes amongst elasmobranchs and presumably rely more heavily on vision than coastal and benthic species, while interspecific variation in the ratio of rod and cone photoreceptors, the topographic distribution of the photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells in the retina and the spatial resolving power of the eye all appear to be closely related to differences in habitat and lifestyle. Multiple, spectrally distinct cone photoreceptor visual pigments have been found in some batoid species, raising the possibility that at least some elasmobranchs are capable of seeing colour, and there is some evidence that multiple cone visual pigments may also be present in holocephalans. In contrast, sharks appear to have only one cone visual pigment. There is evidence that ontogenetic changes in the visual system, such as changes in the spectral transmission properties of the lens, lens shape, focal ratio, visual pigments and spatial resolving power, allow elasmobranchs to adapt to environmental changes imposed by habitat shifts and niche expansion. There are, however, many aspects of vision in these fishes that are not well understood, particularly in the holocephalans. Therefore, this review also serves to highlight and stimulate new research in areas that still require significant attention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 2 2%
Germany 2 2%
Australia 2 2%
Iceland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Namibia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 116 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 25%
Student > Master 26 20%
Student > Bachelor 23 18%
Researcher 15 12%
Unspecified 7 6%
Other 24 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 91 72%
Unspecified 10 8%
Environmental Science 9 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 3%
Other 9 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2012.
All research outputs
#6,463,236
of 12,209,843 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Fish Biology
#1,313
of 2,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,954
of 112,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Fish Biology
#32
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,209,843 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 112,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.