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Non-equilibrium induction of tin in germanium: towards direct bandgap Ge1−xSnx nanowires

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, April 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
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3 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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78 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Non-equilibrium induction of tin in germanium: towards direct bandgap Ge1−xSnx nanowires
Published in
Nature Communications, April 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms11405
Pubmed ID
Authors

Subhajit Biswas, Jessica Doherty, Dzianis Saladukha, Quentin Ramasse, Dipanwita Majumdar, Moneesh Upmanyu, Achintya Singha, Tomasz Ochalski, Michael A. Morris, Justin D. Holmes

Abstract

The development of non-equilibrium group IV nanoscale alloys is critical to achieving new functionalities, such as the formation of a direct bandgap in a conventional indirect bandgap elemental semiconductor. Here, we describe the fabrication of uniform diameter, direct bandgap Ge1-xSnx alloy nanowires, with a Sn incorporation up to 9.2 at.%, far in excess of the equilibrium solubility of Sn in bulk Ge, through a conventional catalytic bottom-up growth paradigm using noble metal and metal alloy catalysts. Metal alloy catalysts permitted a greater inclusion of Sn in Ge nanowires compared with conventional Au catalysts, when used during vapour-liquid-solid growth. The addition of an annealing step close to the Ge-Sn eutectic temperature (230 °C) during cool-down, further facilitated the excessive dissolution of Sn in the nanowires. Sn was distributed throughout the Ge nanowire lattice with no metallic Sn segregation or precipitation at the surface or within the bulk of the nanowires. The non-equilibrium incorporation of Sn into the Ge nanowires can be understood in terms of a kinetic trapping model for impurity incorporation at the triple-phase boundary during growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
China 1 2%
Ireland 1 2%
Unknown 58 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 37%
Student > Master 7 11%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Materials Science 17 27%
Physics and Astronomy 13 21%
Chemistry 9 15%
Engineering 8 13%
Energy 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2021.
All research outputs
#2,147,204
of 19,315,352 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#21,284
of 38,389 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,933
of 273,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#190
of 352 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,315,352 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 38,389 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 53.6. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,566 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 352 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.