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Isotopic Incorporation and the Effects of Fasting and Dietary Lipid Content on Isotopic Discrimination in Large Carnivorous Mammals

Overview of attention for article published in Physiological & Biochemical Zoology, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 404)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
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Title
Isotopic Incorporation and the Effects of Fasting and Dietary Lipid Content on Isotopic Discrimination in Large Carnivorous Mammals
Published in
Physiological & Biochemical Zoology, May 2016
DOI 10.1086/686490
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. D. Rode, C. A. Stricker, J. Erlenbach, C. T. Robbins, S. G. Cherry, S. D. Newsome, A. Cutting, S. Jensen, G. Stenhouse, M. Brooks, A. Hash, N. Nicassio

Abstract

There has been considerable emphasis on understanding isotopic discrimination for diet estimation in omnivores. However, discrimination may differ for carnivores, particularly species that consume lipid-rich diets. Here, we examined the potential implications of several factors when using stable isotopes to estimate the diets of bears, which can consume lipid-rich diets and, alternatively, fast for weeks to months. We conducted feeding trials with captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). As dietary lipid content increased to ∼90%, we observed increasing differences between blood plasma and diets that had not been lipid extracted (∆(13)Ctissue-bulk diet) and slightly decreasing differences between plasma δ(13)C and lipid-extracted diet. Plasma Δ(15)Ntissue-bulk diet increased with increasing protein content for the four polar bears in this study and data for other mammals from previous studies that were fed purely carnivorous diets. Four adult and four yearling brown bears that fasted 120 d had plasma δ(15)N values that changed by <±2‰. Fasting bears exhibited no trend in plasma δ(13)C. Isotopic incorporation in red blood cells and whole blood was ≥6 mo in subadult and adult bears, which is considerably longer than previously measured in younger and smaller black bears (Ursus americanus). Our results suggest that short-term fasting in carnivores has minimal effects on δ(13)C and δ(15)N discrimination between predators and their prey but that dietary lipid content is an important factor directly affecting δ(13)C discrimination and indirectly affecting δ(15)N discrimination via the inverse relationship with dietary protein content.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 65 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 23%
Student > Master 13 20%
Researcher 11 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 56%
Environmental Science 15 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2016.
All research outputs
#973,083
of 15,083,333 outputs
Outputs from Physiological & Biochemical Zoology
#26
of 404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,367
of 264,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physiological & Biochemical Zoology
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,083,333 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,548 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.