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Genomic variation in two gametocyte non-producing Plasmodium falciparum clonal lines

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Genomic variation in two gametocyte non-producing Plasmodium falciparum clonal lines
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1254-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susana Campino, Ernest Diez Benavente, Samuel Assefa, Eloise Thompson, Laura G. Drought, Catherine J. Taylor, Zaria Gorvett, Celine K. Carret, Christian Flueck, Al C. Ivens, Dominic P. Kwiatkowski, Pietro Alano, David A. Baker, Taane G. Clark

Abstract

Transmission of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum from humans to the mosquito vector requires differentiation of a sub-population of asexual forms replicating within red blood cells into non-dividing male and female gametocytes. The nature of the molecular mechanism underlying this key differentiation event required for malaria transmission is not fully understood. Whole genome sequencing was used to examine the genomic diversity of the gametocyte non-producing 3D7-derived lines F12 and A4. These lines were used in the recent detection of the PF3D7_1222600 locus (encoding PfAP2-G), which acts as a genetic master switch that triggers gametocyte development. The evolutionary changes from the 3D7 parental strain through its derivatives F12 (culture-passage derived cloned line) and A4 (transgenic cloned line) were identified. The genetic differences including the formation of chimeric var genes are presented. A genomics resource is provided for the further study of gametocytogenesis or other phenotypes using these parasite lines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2017.
All research outputs
#3,099,523
of 11,465,445 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,163
of 3,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,603
of 275,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#60
of 167 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,465,445 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,441 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 167 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.