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More or less: spontaneous quantity discrimination in the domestic cat

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
More or less: spontaneous quantity discrimination in the domestic cat
Published in
Animal Cognition, April 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10071-016-0985-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oxána Bánszegi, Andrea Urrutia, Péter Szenczi, Robyn Hudson

Abstract

We examined spontaneous quantity discrimination in untrained domestic cats in three food choice experiments. In Experiment 1, we presented the cats with two different quantities of food in eight numerical combinations. Overall, the subjects chose the larger quantity more often than the smaller one, and significantly so when the ratio between the quantities was less than 0.5. In Experiment 2, we presented the cats with two pieces of food in four different size combinations. Again, subjects chose the larger piece above chance, although not in the combination where the largest item was presented. In Experiment 3, a subset of the cats was presented multiple times with two different quantities of food, which were hidden from view. In this case, the cats did not choose the larger quantity more often than the smaller one, suggesting that in the present experiments they mainly used visual cues when comparing quantities. We conclude that domestic cats are capable of spontaneously discriminating quantities when faced with different numbers or sizes of food items, and we suggest why they may not always be motivated to choose the larger quantity. In doing so, we highlight the advantages of testing spontaneous choice behavior, which is more likely to reflect animals' everyday manner of responding than is the case when training them in order to test their absolute limits of performance which may not always coincide with their daily needs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Hungary 1 3%
Unknown 33 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 33%
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Unspecified 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 31%
Psychology 10 28%
Unspecified 9 25%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2016.
All research outputs
#2,124,683
of 13,330,205 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#402
of 983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,182
of 263,605 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#10
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,330,205 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,605 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.