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Spatiotemporal patterns of mercury accumulation in lake sediments of western North America

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
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Title
Spatiotemporal patterns of mercury accumulation in lake sediments of western North America
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.03.167
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul E. Drevnick, Colin A. Cooke, Daniella Barraza, Jules M. Blais, Kenneth H. Coale, Brian F. Cumming, Chris J. Curtis, Biplob Das, William F. Donahue, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Daniel R. Engstrom, William F. Fitzgerald, Chad V. Furl, John E. Gray, Roland I. Hall, Togwell A. Jackson, Kathleen R. Laird, W. Lyle Lockhart, Robie W. Macdonald, M. Alisa Mast, Callie Mathieu, Derek C.G. Muir, Peter M. Outridge, Scott A. Reinemann, Sarah E. Rothenberg, Ana Carolina Ruiz-Fernández, Vincent L. St. Louis, Rhea D. Sanders, Hamed Sanei, Elliott K. Skierszkan, Peter C. Van Metre, Timothy J. Veverica, Johan A. Wiklund, Brent B. Wolfe

Abstract

For the Western North America Mercury Synthesis, we compiled mercury records from 165 dated sediment cores from 138 natural lakes across western North America. Lake sediments are accepted as faithful recorders of historical mercury accumulation rates, and regional and sub-regional temporal and spatial trends were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics. Mercury accumulation rates in sediments have increased, on average, four times (4×) from 1850 to 2000 and continue to increase by approximately 0.2μg/m(2) per year. Lakes with the greatest increases were influenced by the Flin Flon smelter, followed by lakes directly affected by mining and wastewater discharges. Of lakes not directly affected by point sources, there is a clear separation in mercury accumulation rates between lakes with no/little watershed development and lakes with extensive watershed development for agricultural and/or residential purposes. Lakes in the latter group exhibited a sharp increase in mercury accumulation rates with human settlement, stabilizing after 1950 at five times (5×) 1850 rates. Mercury accumulation rates in lakes with no/little watershed development were controlled primarily by relative watershed size prior to 1850, and since have exhibited modest increases (in absolute terms and compared to that described above) associated with (regional and global) industrialization. A sub-regional analysis highlighted that in the ecoregion Northwestern Forest Mountains, <1% of mercury deposited to watersheds is delivered to lakes. Research is warranted to understand whether mountainous watersheds act as permanent sinks for mercury or if export of "legacy" mercury (deposited in years past) will delay recovery when/if emissions reductions are achieved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Unknown 83 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Other 6 7%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 38 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Chemistry 2 2%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 15 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2020.
All research outputs
#586,476
of 15,654,160 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#439
of 14,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,384
of 265,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#5
of 173 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,654,160 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,524 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,493 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 173 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.