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Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
130 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
224 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1112248109
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. McKay, T. Naish, L. Carter, C. Riesselman, R. Dunbar, C. Sjunneskog, D. Winter, F. Sangiorgi, C. Warren, M. Pagani, S. Schouten, V. Willmott, R. Levy, R. DeConto, R. D. Powell

Abstract

The influence of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean on Late Pliocene global climate reconstructions has remained ambiguous due to a lack of well-dated Antarctic-proximal, paleoenvironmental records. Here we present ice sheet, sea-surface temperature, and sea ice reconstructions from the ANDRILL AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. We provide evidence for a major expansion of an ice sheet in the Ross Sea that began at ∼3.3 Ma, followed by a coastal sea surface temperature cooling of ∼2.5 °C, a stepwise expansion of sea ice, and polynya-style deep mixing in the Ross Sea between 3.3 and 2.5 Ma. The intensification of Antarctic cooling resulted in strengthened westerly winds and invigorated ocean circulation. The associated northward migration of Southern Ocean fronts has been linked with reduced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation by restricting surface water connectivity between the ocean basins, with implications for heat transport to the high latitudes of the North Atlantic. While our results do not exclude low-latitude mechanisms as drivers for Pliocene cooling, they indicate an additional role played by southern high-latitude cooling during development of the bipolar world.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 224 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 210 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 28%
Researcher 49 22%
Student > Master 25 11%
Student > Bachelor 15 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 5%
Other 36 16%
Unknown 26 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 140 63%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 10%
Environmental Science 14 6%
Chemistry 4 2%
Arts and Humanities 2 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 34 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 210. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2021.
All research outputs
#118,909
of 19,915,468 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,652
of 93,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#463
of 138,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#20
of 825 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,915,468 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 93,481 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 138,620 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 825 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.