↓ Skip to main content

RNA-binding proteins in mouse male germline stem cells: a mammalian perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Regeneration, January 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
RNA-binding proteins in mouse male germline stem cells: a mammalian perspective
Published in
Cell Regeneration, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13619-015-0022-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huayu Qi

Abstract

Adult stem cells that reside in particular types of tissues are responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Cellular functions of adult stem cells are intricately related to the gene expression programs in those cells. Past research has demonstrated that regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level can decisively alter cell fate of stem cells. However, cellular contents of mRNAs are sometimes not equivalent to proteins, the functional units of cells. It is increasingly realized that post-transcriptional and translational regulation of gene expression are also fundamental for stem cell functions. Compared to differentiated somatic cells, effects on cellular status manifested by varied expression of RNA-binding proteins and global protein synthesis have been demonstrated in several stem cell systems. Through the cooperation of both cis-elements of mRNAs and trans-acting RNA-binding proteins that are intimately associated with them, regulation of localization, stability, and translational status of mRNAs directly influences the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Previous studies have uncovered some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the functions of RNA-binding proteins in stem cells in invertebrate species. However, their roles in adult stem cells in mammals are just beginning to be unveiled. This review highlights some of the RNA-binding proteins that play important functions during the maintenance and differentiation of mouse male germline stem cells, the adult stem cells in the male reproductive organ.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 19%
Researcher 3 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 19%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,189,774
of 7,182,236 outputs
Outputs from Cell Regeneration
#33
of 35 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,795
of 263,048 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Regeneration
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,182,236 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 35 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one scored the same or higher as 2 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,048 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them