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Changes in the intestinal microbiota of superobese patients after bariatric surgery

Overview of attention for article published in Clinics, October 2019
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Title
Changes in the intestinal microbiota of superobese patients after bariatric surgery
Published in
Clinics, October 2019
DOI 10.6061/clinics/2019/e1198
Pubmed ID
Authors

Denis Pajecki, Lea Campos de Oliveira, Ester Cerdeira Sabino, Marcela de Souza-Basqueira, Anna Carolina Batista Dantas, Gabriel Cairo Nunes, Roberto de Cleva, Marco Aurélio Santo

Abstract

The gut microbiota is associated with obesity and weight loss after bariatric surgery and has been related to its changing pattern. Exactly how the bacterial population affects weight loss and the results of surgery remain controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the intestinal microbiota of superobese patients before and after gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). DNA fragments for the microbiota obtained from stool samples collected from nine superobese patients before and after bariatric surgery were sequenced using Ion Torrent. We observed that with a mean follow-up of 15 months, patients achieved 55.9% excess weight loss (EWL). A significant population reduction in the Proteobacteria phylum (11 to 2%, p=0.0025) was observed after surgery, while no difference was seen in Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Further analyses performed with two specific individuals with divergent clinical outcomes showed a change in the pattern between them, with a significant increase in Firmicutes and a decrease in Bacteroidetes in the patient with less weight loss (%EWL 50.79 vs. 61.85). RYGB affects the microbiota of superobese patients, with a significant reduction in Proteobacteria in patients with different weight loss, showing that different bacteria may contribute to the process.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 13 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 16 42%